Early detection and diagnosis
is the best prevention
for endometriosis
logo

Disease Information and Support

The EFA strives to provide relevant and cutting edge information on endometriosis to support those who may be struggling with the disease.  On the following pages, we provide information on the basic biology of endometriosis as well as answer frequently asked questions about the disease.

Click “here” for information on the biology of endometriosis.

Click “here” for FAQ’s 

What is Endometriosis?

Overview It occurs when tissue similar to the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) is found outside the uterus on other parts of the body.  It affects girls and women during their most productive years, and can impact all aspects of their lives – school, careers, finances, relationships, and overall well being. Generally, endometriosis is found in the pelvic cavity. It can attach to any of the female reproductive organs (uterus, fallopian tubes, ovaries), the uterosacral ligaments, the peritoneum, or any of the spaces between the bladder, uterus/vagina, and rectum.  Endometriosis can also be found, though less commonly, on the…
Read more...

Frequently Asked Questions

Endometriosis: Fast Facts Endometriosis is a disease of the female reproductive system Endometriosis affects women during childbearing age (from her first period until menopause) Endometriosis affects 1 in 10 women worldwide Symptoms typically begin during puberty There is an average of a 10-year delay in diagnosing endometriosis Endometriosis is one of the leading causes of infertility Is there a “cure” for endometriosis? There is no cure for endometriosis, but there are many treatment options to greatly improve patients’ quality of life.   What if my period comes once and then not again for three or four months? During puberty there…
Read more...

Preparing to See a Doctor

If you think you may have endometriosis, finding an endometriosis specialist is crucial to getting proper treatment for the disease. Finding the right doctor can be tricky, but arming yourself with research and good information can help simplify the process. Begin by reviewing your symptoms with your family doctor, or another trusted medical professional, so they can assist you with recommendations, referrals, and follow-up care.  The proper specialist is one who has thorough knowledge of endometriosis, including: exceptional surgical skills and training, access to the most modern surgical equipment and techniques, current understanding of various treatments, and openness to complementary…
Read more...

Endometriosis: For Teens

  Ever wonder why it seems like your period is worse than your friends’? Do you ever feel like a wimp when it comes to your period? Why is it so much easier for others to deal with? Does your period make you miss out on school, sports, or social events? If so, you have come to the right place!   Endo – what?! How do you even say that word? Endometriosis (pronounced end-oh-me-tree-oh-sis or endo for short) occurs when the lining of your uterus (the stuff that is normally shed during your period) is present outside the uterus in places…
Read more...